Leaders: Leave Your Ego at the Door

One of the most interesting aspects of leadership is that all people bring something unique to the table. Many articles on leadership will talk about qualities like integrity, effective communication or influence, while these are all good qualities, maybe even all necessary qualities of a leader, they don’t mean much if a leader doesn’t put their people ahead of themselves.

In the early days of being in a leadership position many will think that their title is all they need. That with the title will come automatic respect and and inclination to follow whomever bears the title. Many “young” leaders must learn is that leadership is something one must work hard at.

Sometimes “young” leaders will have a peer come to them and confront them about their selfish attitude, but not always. Not only is it a leader’s job to support their people through constructive criticism, feedback and support, but the leader needs to be self-critical and realize that their own attitudes and practices do affect the team.

When leader is doing well their success should be visible in the success of those they lead. The leader should acknowledge these accomplishments in both private and public. The leader should know their teammates, not just their name, position and responsibilities—but the real person outside their responsibility to the team. Leaders must leave their own ego at the door; your teammates are going to accomplish things you cannot and that is OK. Having a peer be able to move on to another opportunity, in part because of the leader’s mentorship should be viewed as a leader’s greatest accomplishment. Give your teammates an environment in which they can become the best possible version of themselves.

In doing these things all members of the team will be viewed as successful when success comes and when it does not, the environment to move on and try again will have already been fostered.

How to Be Viewed as a Leader

How do emerging leaders become viewed as such by their peers and superiors? What does it take to be considered an emerging leader? What are these people doing that sets them apart, not just in the eyes of their superiors, but also their peers?

It isn’t about being a yes-person or company person or a thankless workhorse. It is about influence. It’s about doing things that make people feel good about the work when you are on the team. They should choose to follow you, your advice and suggestions when offered. Better yet, become the kind of person from whom people seek suggestions and advice.

Influential employees identify problems, take them to people in power, offer practical, thoughtful solutions, note their own role in whatever mess needs mending, and offer to take part in the repair work they suggest. Telling your bosses that all’s not well can be risky when done wrong, but rewarding when you prove yourself to be the “loyal opposition.”

If you’re seen as operating from a small silo while ignoring the organization’s big picture, you won’t be taken seriously. At the same time, if you’re not interested in learning new skills as your business evolves or keeping updated on industry developments, your colleagues won’t count on you to do more than stagnate in the status quo while others lead change.

Finally, people who automatically look for ways to help others tend to do well at work, unless they are so self-sacrificing that they’re taken advantage of and fail to effectively manage their own time and workload.

These principles can be applied to our work inside all kinds of organizations like NPOs and community projects, not just at work.

Source:
https://www.poynter.org/news/four-ways-be-seen-leader-even-when-youre-not-charge