Unusual Leadership Qualities

These may not be the usual type of qualities you see on leadership trait lists. But they are all as important as traits we commonly hear about.

Calmness when making hard decisions. He says it may be easy to make a decision but not always easy to make a good decision. If a decision is tough and emotion-filled, try to wait a while or sleep on it.

Grace under pressure. This is related to the first quality. Try not to get agitated too quickly or unnecessarily. Handle stress effectively.

Consistency. Here Victor talks about being consistent in your behavior. Employees want leadership they can count on and trust.

Persistence. Not everything is accomplished easily on the first try. Perseverance after disappointment may be hard to come by but will help.

Judgment. Other synonyms for this may be experience, seasoning, or business savvy. He says they all add up to judgment. This is used by leaders to make decisions to yield positive outcomes.

Shaping Your Organization’s Personality Via Example

Guiding the “vibe” or “personality” of your organizations culture is an important part of being a leader. And often it is what happens between the meetings and the group work sessions that shapes your organization’s culture as much or more than what happens at meetings and other group activities.

For example, the jokes you choose to laugh at will shape what is considered appropriate in your organization’s workplace. How much you choose to initiate “joking around” will also shape the personality of what kinds of interpersonal relationships people build. This goes for casual conversation as well—what will you engage in and how often?

The topics of casual conversations and how you respond to them will set a tone. Will you choose to engage in a casual conversation about politics or religion? How much or often will you engage in conversation about your personal life and family? How much is too much to know about someone’s personal life?

But it isn’t just you, observe your team members. Their reactions will tell you when they think something is too much. It may also fall to you to speak to a team member if they’ve taken things too far in a conversation or broached a taboo topic.

Some may believe that the garage of a mechanic shop and a boardroom or two different places that require different etiquette. However, in a successful business it is always important to strike the balance between goal-driven professionalism and a friendly work environment where smiles and laughs are welcome.

While having written guidelines in place is important, team members do not interact with guidelines every day. They do, however, interact with you and their peers each day. As a leader you should be a daily example of whatever guidelines have been set to print. What is accepted as usual from day to day will shape the personality of your organization more than its written counterpart.

Why Do Valued Team Members Leave? Part 2

All leaders in business and non-business organizations will have one of their best quit on them. Sometimes it’ll be obvious why, other times leaders will be left scratching their heads as to why one of their best and brightest is suddenly gone. Especially with the new trend of “ghosting” in our society—leaving suddenly and without explanation—leaders may want to heed the following thoughts.

While a seasoned leader probably wouldn’t make the classic mistake of overworking their best, which is tempting when a peer is particularly talented (why wouldn’t you want them on every project?).

A leader might also under appreciate their best team member’s talent. These are some more obvious reasons someone might up and leave. Yet there are some less obvious reasons an employee might suddenly disappear. And it should be no surprise that these reasons are somewhat all a different side of the same issue.

First, make sure you are challenging your best team members. Those who aren’t being given work according appropriate to their talent. Sure, this employee will get the job done and probably in a timely fashion but piling on what feels like busy work will lead to boredom and force this talented person to seek challenges outside their comfort zone elsewhere.

Why Do Valued Team Members Leave? Part 1

All leaders in business and non-business organizations will have one of their best quit on them. Sometimes it’ll be obvious why, other times leaders will be left scratching their heads as to why one of their best and brightest is suddenly gone. Especially with the new trend of “ghosting” in our society—leaving suddenly and without explanation—leaders may want to heed the following thoughts.

While a seasoned leader probably wouldn’t make the classic mistake of overworking their best, which is tempting when a peer is particularly talented (why wouldn’t you want them on every project?). A leader might also under appreciate their best team member’s talent. These are some more obvious reasons someone might up and leave. Yet there are some less obvious reasons an employee might suddenly disappear. And it should be no surprise that these reasons are somewhat all a different side of the same issue.

First, make sure you are challenging your best team members. Those who aren’t being given work according appropriate to their talent. Sure, this employee will get the job done and probably in a timely fashion but piling on what feels like busy work will lead to boredom and force this talented person to seek challenges outside their comfort zone elsewhere.

The Value of Apologies

When delivered with sincerity two of the most difficult sentences to speak are probably “I apologize” and “apology accepted” or another reasonable proxy of the pair. The first has one admitting to fault, where the second releases it. If only our lives were like the sitcoms where no matter the trouble husbands and wives, brothers and sisters, parents and their children, or co-workers get all the loose ends tied up in a matter of sixty minutes or less. Everyone hugs and the camera fades out.

Unfortunately admitting to and forgiving fault isn’t something most of us are good at. But when this exchange doesn’t occur that can create a toxic cycle inside an organization. But, how does an organization reach a state of honesty?

Pride must be put aside. The issue is that humans are savagely self-protective, it’s an evolutionary reaction to a threatening world. No longer is the danger an apex predator, but our image among our peers. None the less, we fight for it tooth and nail. So, breaking through pride is to against our instinct. It will be difficult. Second, one needs to not take things personally. Everyone makes mistakes. And most mistakes are hardly so terrible as to warrant defining a person.

We have to unburden ourselves of these very human experiences. Helping our peers and mentees realize that everyone needs to go through this process for the greater good is an essential activity for any leader.

Rethinking Meetings Part 3

Another way to make meetings more effective is to make sure the leader isn’t doing all the talking. Meeting leaders tend to rate meetings as more effective than attendees; likewise, other research shows that those who talk most at meetings rate them more highly than others. A meeting should never be just one person talking—you may have heard the joke “this meeting could have been an email.” Well, if it is just one person talking is this entirely wrong?

If you think you are doing too much talking during a meeting, you probably are.

Meetings should be interactive, everyone in the room should be there for a reason and that should be to provide some kind of feedback or input. Meetings should have any spectators, only participants.

Speaking of activity, walking meetings are an interesting trend for 3-4 people sized meetings. They are a change of pace and may even allow participants to get into the outdoors.

Companies like LinkedIn and Johnson & Johnson have made walking meetings a part of their corporate culture. They get the blood moving and most people feel more energized and engaged because of the physical activity.

If you are at home you can try getting on a treadmill or other appropriate exercise machine, walking around your yard or neighborhood.

Remember that all of this applies to both face-to-face and virtual meetings. Give the same respect to people’s time which ever kind of meeting you are planning.