How to Ask For Advice

Asking for and actually getting good advice is more of a science than one might think. They way one begins the conversation is important. Keep the tone as positive as possible. Something simple and direct—I’d love you advice—will do the trick.

One should immediately identify the kind of advice they are seeking and after their opening line address the topic in the form of a question. Come to the conversation prepared with questions and specific details. Make sure you clearly define the problem. Stay on topic so you aren’t wasting someone’s time with a wandering conversation.

Additionally, take time to consider who is the right person to ask for advice from. People often go to friends or family members for advice because they are comfortable speaking to them. However, that doesn’t make that person the right one to ask. You need someone with knowledge and experience with whatever it is you are dealing with.

Don’t ask too many people. You can’t follow everyone’s advice and there are diminishing returns with too many opinions to analyze.

Don’t ask for advice if what you are seeking is validation or praise. If one has no intention of seriously considering another’s opinion, don’t waste anyone’s time.

Quick Tips on Improving the Work Flow of Your Team

Stop wasting time with meaningless meetings, whatever kind of organizations you’ve been a part of, sure you’ve attended a meeting that could have been an email. Make sure only necessary team members attend—there is nothing worse then attending a meeting that doesn’t apply to you. Do your best to keep everyone engaged, don’t allow for distractions (instruct that cell phones are to be left outside).

While the cliché stands that two or more minds is better than one actually making a group decision is quite challenging even when the decision is of smaller consequence. To improve group decision making make sure you define the task. Choose the right team members to work with to come to a decision. Set criteria for the decision to be made. Brainstorm and set in stone several options before voting or discussing. Come up with a pre-agreed upon selection process. Develop plans to put the decision into action. Evaluate the effectiveness of the decision and the process that created it.

As you improve yourself you need to support your employees in their personal development. It is important as it makes everyone on the team better. Give team members time to fully engage with new learning and skill development. You might even develop some in-house opportunities for essential skill sets for new team members. Follow up with your team members and discuss what they’ve learned and how they are applying it. When everyone is always improving there will be fewer stoppages to instruct in areas where team members lack.

 

 

How To Be A Leader At Their Best

Take the lead with self-care and self-learning. Demonstrate by doing. You are effectiveness as leader is dependent on your own health and personal improvement.

Healthier people usually have more energy, think more clearly, have a longer attention span and don’t get sick as often. Good leaders should be eating a healthy diet—consult your physician on what this may mean for you. Strive to get enough, quality sleep. Do your best to partake in physical activity—you might even make group exercise a part of your team’s day on occasion. Try to mitigate stress.

Being a good leader means staying on top of your game. Don’t feel pressured to always have all the answers, but you should always be learning new skills, studying new subject matter and developing your leadership tools. While you are surely busy you’ll want to make the best use of your time. Commit. Set real deadlines and block out time for self-improvement on your calendar in pen. Immediately find ways to put new knowledge, skills and tools into practice. You don’t actually learn until you use new knowledge.

Finally, celebrate your successes. This will help subconsciously reinforce the value of a healthy lifestyle and ongoing learning.

 

 

The Physical Traits of Confidence

Appearing confident (even if one isn’t) is very much about body language and to exude confidence we must present a “total package.”

First, steady eye contact is a must. Looking around, looking to a digital device, to the side or to the ground is a no-no. Eye contact makes people feel important and engaged.

There are a lot of opinions about handshakes and while a lot of people dislike “firm” handshakes, that is because many people over do it. Don’t crush someone’s hand but do be firm. Also, don’t play the game of trying to be the last to let go, this is more likely to lead to awkwardness than make one look confident.

Another way to create a persona of confidence is to engage someone by very lightly touching their shoulder. President Obama is famous for doing this. It can signal leadership, confidence and put the other person at ease.

When speaking to a group keep your feet firmly planted on the ground. Shifting your weight or crossing and uncrossing your legs makes you look nervous and fidgety. Take up space with your hands. Don’t be afraid to fill the empty space physical with your presence. Gesturing while speaking and filling the space with your presence with controlled and calculated movements will make you seem more confident, however be careful not to do it too much or too quickly, this can look chaotic.

Watching What We Say

While it is improbable to think one will go through life without ever offending someone, here are some faux-paus to actively avoid and the reasons why one should avoid them.

Don’t every tell a peer that they “look tired”. The imagery evoked by this comment is not flattering. Tired persons have darkened rings about the eyes, unkempt hair and maybe disheveled clothes. They cannot concentrate and are probably grumpy. If you are concerned about a peer just ask if they are OK. While asking if someone looks tired is usually meant to be helpful, it can often be misunderstood as a slight. Likewise, saying someone has lost a ton of weight implies they were fat to begin with, instead just tell your peer the look good without commenting on their previous appearance.

Sometimes slight rephrasings of comments meant in support of a colleague can totally change the interpreted meaning. If someone ends a romantic relationship, don’t ever tell your peer they were to good for them. This may be misconstrued as meaning the peer has poor taste in romantic partners. “Their loss” implies no criticism.

If you do need to criticize someone—hopefully in a helpful way—don’t ever tell a person that they “always” or “never” do something. In the real-world absolutes aren’t really factual. No person always or never does something. Often or frequently or another synonym implies a habit and habits can be changed where as absolutes feel written in stone.

Hopefully these tips will get you thinking about other common sayings and phrasings that might get misinterpreted.

Leadership is More Than Motivation

At the point when team members aren’t just drawn in, but are roused and full of energy, that is when organizations see genuine leaps forward. Roused workers are themselves unquestionably beneficial and, thus, motivate people around them to take a stab at more difficult achievements.

A few people concur that their leaders were moving towards or were creating inspiration in workers. Indeed, even less felt that their leaders encouraged commitment or responsibility and displayed the way of life and values of the organization.

Things being what they are, motivation alone isn’t sufficient. Similarly, as pioneers who convey just execution may do as such at a cost that the association is reluctant to manage, the individuals who center just around motivation may find that they inspire the troops yet are undermined by fair results. Rather, moving pioneers are the individuals who utilize their one of a kind mix of qualities to spur people and groups to go up against strong missions – and consider them responsible for results. What’s more, they open higher execution through strengthening, not order and control.