Helping Your Kids Become Leaders Part 1

We  need our kids to wind up leaders.

Regardless of whether they spend the main part of their days in the mailroom or the corner office, we need our kids to develop to be gutsy, enthusiastic. We need their activities to move other individuals to be their best, to get more out of life.

As guardians and overseers of youngsters, their way to leadership is in our hands. It’s a major duty—however when isn’t being a parent a huge obligation?

Focus on the ideas below, and you’ll create leadership in your kids and yourself.

Emotional energy is that “something” in every one of us that is somewhat impalpable; it influences how we oversee conduct, explore social complexities, and settle on close to home choices that accomplish positive outcomes.

Youngsters take in emotional energy from their folks. As your kids watch you consistently, they mimic your conduct. Youngsters are especially sensitive to your familiarity with feelings, the conduct you show because of your feelings, and how you respond and react to their feelings.

Parents get sucked into fixating on accomplishment since they trust that this will make their youngsters into high-achievers. Rather, focusing on accomplishment creates a wide range of issues for kids. This is particularly obvious with regards to authority, where concentrating on singular accomplishment gives kids the wrong thought regarding how function completes.

Basically, the best pioneers encircle themselves with extraordinary individuals since they know they can’t do only it. Accomplishment fixated kids are so centered around honors and results that they never completely comprehend this. Everything they can see is the player who’s given the MVP trophy and the superstar CEO who makes the news—they expect it’s about the person. It’s a severe shock once they find how genuine functions.

Kids require acknowledgement to know a sound feeling of confidence. Shockingly, heaping on the praise doesn’t give them additional confidence. Youngsters need to put stock in themselves and to build up the fearlessness required to end up fruitful pioneers, yet on the off chance that you spout each time they put pen to paper or kick a ball (the “everybody gets a trophy” attitude), this makes perplexity and false certainty. Continuously demonstrate your youngsters how pleased you are of their energy and exertion; simply don’t paint them as geniuses when you know it isn’t valid.

Tips for Leading by Example

You should demonstrate to your group by your own actions and not take a “Do as I say, not as I do” disposition. You will rapidly distance  yourself from your staff. In the event that your own expectations are high, they are more able to adjust to them. Check your own physical wellness, cleanliness and appearance before remarking on theirs. Try not to set your benchmarks higher than you will go yourself.

Show you will do a similar thing you ask of your workers/staff.

Be physically fit, all around prepared, and well dressed.

Foster hopefulness, serenity, and certainty.

Promote self motivation.

Offer challenges with your staff so they see you are ready to accept your offer of them.

Show your staff that you are the best in the position you are in.

Delegate expert and keep away from miniaturized scale administration and over-supervision of your staff.

John Peter Zenger: A Symbol for Freedom of the Press

“Great leaders are not defined by the absence of weakness, but rather by the presence of clear strengths.” John Peter Zenger

While most people have never heard of John Peter Zenger, they may have heard the latter quote or something akin to it. Zenger was an important figure in American history as the printer of the “New York Weekly Journal” and was famously sued by colonial governor William Crosby for libel. When he was acquitted he became a symbol for the freedom of the press.

Zenger was German immigrant to the American Colonies. Zenger and his family immigrated in 1710 as part of a large German Palatines group. The colonial Governor promised all of the children in the group an education and Zenger worked under the first printer in the American Colonies, William Bradford.

It was in 1773 that Zenger printed the article that would cause Crosby to sue him. Cosby wasn’t satisfied with is salary and couldn’t control the local government so he removed one of the judges and placed someone friendly to his party in the former judge’s seat.
Zenger and his paper being part of the opposing party, continued to print articles disagreeing with Cosby’s actions. Alexander Hamilton and William Smith Sr were his lawyers and eventually winning the libel suit against Zenger.

James C. Humes: The Man Behind the Words of Five Presidents

“Every time you have to speak, you are auditioning for leadership.”

James C. Humes is most famously known as a presidential speechwriter. He has served as a communications advisor to major U.S. corporations, including IBM and DuPont. He is the author of twenty-three other books.

Humes wrote speeches for presidents Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Gerald Ford, and Dwight Eisenhower. Before his speechwriting career, he represented the U.S. State Department in lectures on American government all over the world. He has served as a communications advisor to major U.S. corporations, including IBM and DuPont. Mr. Humes is a well known author, most famously for Confessions of a White House Ghost Writer (Regnery Publishing) and the Pulitzer Prize-nominated Churchill: Speaker of the Century.

One of the last living Americans to have met Sir Winston Churchill in person, Mr. Humes has played Sir Churchill on stage and at numerous events. Mr. Humes lives in Pueblo, Colorado.

As James Humes once said, “The art of communication is the language of leadership.” If you want to be a leader, you must be a presenter that connects with the audience and delivers a memorable message.

Obsession: Pat Riley

Patrick James Riley, born in1945, is an American professional basketball executive, and also a former coach as well as a player in the National Basketball Association. He has been the team president of the Miami Heat since 1995 as well as head coach in two separate tenures.

Know as one of the elite few among NBA coaches, Riley has served as the head coach of five championship teams. He won four with the Los Angeles Lakers during their Showtime era in the 1980s. And also one with the Miami Heat in 2006.

In 1996, he was named one of the 10 Greatest Coaches in NBA history. He played for the Lakers’ championship team in 1972 as well. Riley won the 2012 and 2013 NBA championships with the Heat as their team president. He also received the Chuck Daly Lifetime Achievement Award from the NBA Coaches Association.

Riley has been quoted as saying that, “To have long term success as a coach or in any position of leadership, you have to be obsessed in some way.” Clearly, his healthy obsession with the game lead him to become one of the great leaders in NBA history.

He was named NBA Coach of the Year three times. He was head coach of an NBA All-Star Game team nine times. Amazingly, he is the first North American sports figure to win a championship as a player, assistant coach, head coach, and as an executive.

 

Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper

Grace Brewster Murray Hopper was an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral. One of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, she was a pioneer of computer programming who invented one of the first compiler related tools. She popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, an early high-level programming language still in use today.

Hopper had attempted to enlist in the Navy during World War II, but she was rejected by the military because she was 34 years of age and too old to enlist. She instead joined the Navy Reserves. Hopper began her computing career when she worked on the Harvard Mark I team that was led by Howard H. Aiken.

Owing to her accomplishments and her naval rank, she was sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”. The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper was named for her, as was the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC. During her lifetime, Hopper was awarded 40 honorary degrees from universities across the world. A college at Yale University is named in her honor. In 1991, she received the National Medal of Technology. On November 22, 2016, she was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Rear Admiral “Amazing” Grace Hooper is well known for having said of leadership, “You manage things; you lead people.”