Swift Rewards, Slow Punishments

While not a traditional leader per-se, Ovid’s contribution to thought and literature are still felt today all the way back from ancient Greece. His insights into human nature are revealed through his poetry, which often took up the subject of kings and gods.

Of leadership Ovid had to say: a ruler should be slow to punish and quick to reward.

Ovid was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a contemporary of the older Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists. He enjoyed enormous popularity, but, in one of the mysteries of literary history, was sent by Augustus into exile in a remote province on the Black Sea, where he remained until his death. Ovid himself attributes his exile to carmen et error, “a poem and a mistake”, but his discretion in discussing the causes has resulted in much speculation among scholars.

The first major Roman poet to begin his career during the reign of Augustus, Ovid is today best known for the Metamorphoses, a 15-book continuous mythological narrative written in the meter of epic, and for works in elegiac couplets such as Ars Amatoria (“The Art of Love”) and Fasti. His poetry was much imitated during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, and greatly influenced Western art and literature. The Metamorphoses remains one of the most important sources of classical mythology.

Electoral College

When we talk about leaders, the most popular one at the moment to us is our own president. Recently there was an election and then a big push by the losing team for the Electoral College votes to overturn the votes. So the Victor crew wanted to know a little more about what the Electoral College is all about. For this we turn to CGP Grey on YouTube to see how he explains it.

Here is his first video on How the Electoral College Works:

Here is the second part video called The Trouble with the Electoral College

He has an updated video of the second part that was uploaded just last month:

Here is some further reading: http://history.house.gov/Institution/Electoral-College/Electoral-College/

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens is known for his many novels. Whether or not you have read them all, you most likely have come across or heard some of his many writings. Some of his more popular writings were The Pickwick Papers, Oliver Twist, Great Expectations, A Christmas Carol, David Copperfield, A Tale of Two Cities.

He lived from February 1812 to June 1870. He left school young to work in a factory when his father went to debtor’s prison. His first writing was The Pickwick Papers which was serialized, a common practice at one time. This also allowed him to evaluate his audience’s reaction and modify based on feedback. Some of his life experiences were used in his stories – people and places. His most autobiographical novel was David Copperfield.

He visited the United States and Canada. In his second visit, delayed by the Civil War, he met with such giants as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. He died in 1870 after a stroke.

No matter how you have heard of Charles Dickens, almost everyone has seen or heard A Christmas Carol in some form. There have been many renditions of this story in plays and movies.

You can see a more comprehensive outline of his life here.