Leadership and the Digital World

While the world has become more digital and more complex that simple statement doesn’t encapsulate the far-reaching implications of digital technology. Unlike other technologies before it, the changes to our social ecosystem caused by digitization have touched and changed almost everything.

To survive as a value-creator, a leader needs a new set of skills.  This new set of skills include things like rely not only on one’s strengths but an ever-expanding skill set. Leaders learned to work with people who think different and come from many backgrounds. They put an emphasis on collaboration, especially in instances of serious differences.

Leaders more than ever have to think about what the future is going to look like and what their organization’s role in that future is going to be. Leaders need to be highly strategic and have the ability disassociate from day-to-day concerns to look into the horizon. They should always be looking for a way to create value.

However, being strategic isn’t enough. The new leader also needs to be able to execute plans to find new ways of making value. Usually, these decisions and putting them into action has to be done quickly as our world moves more and more rapidly.

Train Them as a Team

Your staff should be trained, challenged, and encouraged with perfection and teamwork as a goal. No excuse should be made for leaders not to train their staff be the best in their profession. Train with a purpose and emphasize the essential element of teamwork.

The sharing of tasks and hard work should strengthen reduce problems, develop teamwork, improve morale and give a feeling of unbounded loyalty.

Teamwork is the key to successful operations. Teamwork is essential from the smallest business to the largest. As a boss, you must insist on teamwork from your staff. Train and operate as a team. Be sure that each everyone knows his/her position and responsibilities within the team framework.

When team spirit is in evidence, the most difficult tasks become much easier to accomplish. Teamwork is a two-way street. Individuals give their best, and in return the team provides security, recognition, and a sense of accomplishment.

  1. Train, study and train, prepare, and train thoroughly, endlessly.
  2. Strive to maintain individual stability and unit integrity; keep the same leader as long as possible if they’re getting the job done. Needless changes disrupt teamwork.
  3. Emphasize use of the “buddy” system.
  4. Never publicly blame an individual for the team’s failure nor praise one individual for the team’s success.
  5. Provide the best available facilities for training and make maximum use of teamwork.
  6. Ensure that all training is meaningful, and that its purpose is clear to all members of the staff.
  7. Acquaint each individual of your staff with the capabilities and limitations of others, thereby developing mutual trust and understanding.
  8. Base team training on realistic, current, and probable conditions.
  9. Insist that everyone understands the functions of the other members of the team and how the team functions as a part of the whole.

Rear Admiral Murray Hooper

Grace Brewster Murray Hopper was an American computer scientist and United States Navy rear admiral. One of the first programmers of the Harvard Mark I computer, she was a pioneer of computer programming who invented one of the first compiler related tools. She popularized the idea of machine-independent programming languages, which led to the development of COBOL, an early high-level programming language still in use today.

Hopper had attempted to enlist in the Navy during World War II, but she was rejected by the military because she was 34 years of age and too old to enlist. She instead joined the Navy Reserves. Hopper began her computing career when she worked on the Harvard Mark I team that was led by Howard H. Aiken.

Owing to her accomplishments and her naval rank, she was sometimes referred to as “Amazing Grace”. The U.S. Navy Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Hopper was named for her, as was the Cray XE6 “Hopper” supercomputer at NERSC. During her lifetime, Hopper was awarded 40 honorary degrees from universities across the world. A college at Yale University is named in her honor. In 1991, she received the National Medal of Technology. On November 22, 2016, she was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama.

Rear Admiral “Amazing” Grace Hooper is well known for having said of leadership, “You manage things; you lead people.”