Always Two Opportunities

In all aspects of our lives there are always two sets of opportunities in front of us—one set governs where we are, a current job, a current relationship, a current volunteer activity, a current hobby and then there are those things only available if we actively seek them.

Whatever those new things are that we seek, if we find them and develop them we become more versatile. It could be that what we have currently (a job, relationship, volunteerism, hobby) provides us with the tools to become more versatile. Sometimes we need to actively find new things to learn, new skills to develop, new networks to tap into.

If we only remain qualified to maintain our current job, relationship, volunteer activity or hobby we are vulnerable to or unprepared for change.

Every day we should set out two lists of tasks for ourselves: one to maintain that which we already have and one that will allow us to expand the boundaries of our experience and knowledge.

It doesn’t matter who you are—an entrepreneur who created your own job, an employee, a community organization leader or member, a high school or college student, a retiree, or a stay at home parent—you have the capability, this very moment, to prepare for what comes next.

Turn Your Organization Into a Team

We often refer to groups, organizations etc as our “team”, but are they really a team? Teams need dedication and training. Here are some ideas to focus on when turning your group of peers into a functioning team.

Train, study and train, prepare, and train thoroughly, endlessly.

Strive to maintain individual stability and unit integrity; keep the same leader as long as possible if they’re getting the job done. Needless changes disrupt teamwork.

Emphasize use of the “buddy” system.

Never publicly blame an individual for the team’s failure nor praise one individual for the team’s success.

Provide the best available facilities for training and make maximum use of teamwork.

Ensure that all training is meaningful, and that its purpose is clear to all members of the staff.

Acquaint each individual of your staff with the capabilities and limitations of others, thereby developing mutual trust and understanding.

Base team training on realistic, current, and probable conditions.

Insist that everyone understands the functions of the other members of the team and how the team functions as a part of the whole.

12 Habits to Incorporate into Your Leadership Practice

1. Courage
People like to know the one they are following is courageous.

2. Effective Communication
You need to be a great communicator to effectively manage and inspire people who work for you.

3. Generosity
Great leaders share credit and praise where it is due. They are committed to their followers’ success.

4. Humility
Leaders who show humbleness will jump in and do the dirty work.

5. Self-Awareness
This is the foundation of emotional intelligence. They have a clear and accurate image of their own strengths and weaknesses.

6. Adherence to the Golden Rule
The Golden Rule says to treat others the way you want to be treated.

7. Passion
Passion is contagious. If a leader is enthusiastic, others will be as well.

8. Infectiousness
Not only have a clear vision but a plan to make that vision become a reality.

9. Authenticity
Be honest in everything. Make sure your words and actions align with who you claim to be.

10. Approachability
Welcome challenges, criticism, and viewpoints other than your own.

11. Accountability
Back up your followers. Don’t shift blame when facing failure.

12. Sense of Purpose
Understand your purpose and why you’re going there.