Working From Home Part 2: Distractions, Expectations and Boundaries

The last article ended on concerns about your kids using up all the WiFi—unless you have unusually self-sufficient kids or older children who understand that you are at work even though you are at home keeping them occupied could be an issue.

Believe it or not most kids like having a schedule and find comfort in that familiarity—so make a schedule and stick to it. Books, puzzles and other quiet games are good. Also, some screen time is OK. Some television is fine. If you let your kids play video games those are OK as well.

If you have the right mix of ages among your children asking the older ones to help.

Now that you’ve got your family and technology sorted, what next?

Make sure you and your boss are on the same page about what the expectations are for your new work from home position. Do you need to be 100% available during business hours or can you work asynchronously to a degree? Will you be handling all the same work or has your position changed slightly since you are moving home?

If this transition is absolutely new to everyone (you, the company, your boss) keeping an open dialog and noting what is going well and not so well will be key.

You’ll also have to consider yourself—can you jump out of bed, sit down and get to it cup of coffee in hand? Are you easily distractible?

Many work from home guru’s have long made the suggestion that people maintain their typical morning routine. This includes the clothes you wear. For some, this will be necessary to switch their brain over to “work mode.”  This will take some trial and error.

Likewise, you need to establish clear boundaries with you job. Working from should not mean you are available day and night, weekdays and weekends. If you have web phone setting it to DND or unplugging it after work hours as well as shutting down your work computer complete is a signal to both your job and your brain that the work-day is done.

Working from Home Part 1: Technology

Working from home for the first time can be a challenge but here are some tips to get you going.

First, get your technology sorted. This means hardware and software. Your IT department may or may not have guides written to get you started. If you are working with any kind of sensitive information, especially the kind a company can be legally liable for, you’ll want to know for certain that information stays secure. If you aren’t provided with any specific IT instructions, guidelines or help make sure to inquire on your own.

Make sure you’ve got your home WiFi and work computer talking to each other and getting along before the first day of work. Make sure all your software functions as it should and that you can log into whatever you need to just as you do at work.

If you are going be relying heavily on video conferencing, make sure your internet connection has enough bandwidth to handle the calls. You’ll want to make some test calls, maybe with a peer from work, to check this.

If your connection is too slow, don’t immediately upgrade your service. There are several things to look into to open up some bandwidth on your current connection. If you don’t absolutely require video, making an audio only conference call takes far less bandwidth. Other users, like kids, may be using a ton of bandwidth if many of them are accessing the internet from different devices at once. You may need to set ground rules for when children can use the WiFi.tech