Leadership as a Process

Leadership is a process. A complex one. It is a relationship built between leader and follower. This group also has the element of a goal everyone desires.

There are five moving parts that interact to create the entity of relationship of exchanges—the leader, the followers, the situation, the process itself and the results. On a timeline each of these parts influences the others and the outcomes of these interactions set precedents for the future.

Leaders are typically viewed as one who orchestrates or guides. The set the tone for the group in the hopes of moving forward with a goal in mind. Followers are not to be viewed as passive, however. In fact, many now view the followers as the most critical aspect of the relationship. It is the follower who sees the situation and defines the needs of the group to accomplish the goal.

The personality of the follower is what determines what kind of leadership style will be most effective. Leadership is not one philosophy the leader foists onto any group of followers.

The situation surrounds the followers and the leader and helps define what the followers need from the leader. Will the groups current skill set be able to solve the problem of the situation or do they need new guidance from the leader? Are the goals of the group clear? What are the emotions of the group concerning the problem to solve or the goals? Excited? Frustrated? Defeated?

Finally, there is the process itself which is distinct from the leader (the orchestrator). This process is never finished and evolves even as the situation, the goals, the followers and even the orchestrator change or move on.

In a sense the leader must be the most malleable and open to adaptation and change. The situation is defined, the leader’s team is defined, the goal is defined, the process of leadership is an always moving target. The leader must see this picture and adapt to be successful.

 

 

Basic Tips For Beating Winter Blues

 

Many of us go through periods of low energy or periods of feeling “blue” when the days dark, short and cold. This energy very easily comes with us to our work. Whether a leader or a team member this wintertime energy drop can make it very tough for us to be our best. However, there are some easy things you can try at the office to help energize people.  

It is well established that the lack of sunlight during winter months affects people’s moods and health. An easy way to combat this is a light therapy box, many of which fit neatly on an average desk. Specifically, the correct kind of light helps the body release the “feel good” chemical in our brains Serotonin. These light boxes need to emit at least 2,500 lux to be effective. It is recommended, typically, that people use these in the morning—many find it helps them wake up. Additionally, some people will use the light boxes during their mid-day slump to energize them instead of more coffee or caffeine.  

Introducing real plants into the office can help everyone. Researchers have found the benefits range from increased productivity, stress reduction and they can even affect positively the amount of sick days taken by employees. They also help increase or oxygen intake. Living walls are now popular, however average house plants in regular planters will work as well if not as fashionable.  

Many offices are aesthetically dull, especially in the color department. While a total make-over might be out of the question adding some bright yellow, pink, red or blue to your surroundings can help us feel alert and more cheerful. Add some colorful pieces of décor to your desk or spruce up the office with some new artwork—combine this with the previous suggestion, get some plants with colorful pots.  

You may want to consider taking extra time to keep things tidy in our workspace as this will unclutter your mind. Also, people get quite dried out in the winter, pay close attention to your hydration levels.