Eleanor Rosalynn Carter: First Lady and Leader

“A leader takes people where they want to go. A great leader takes people where they don’t necessarily want to go, but ought to be.”

– Rosalynn Carter

Eleanor Rosalynn Carter is the wife of the 39th President, Jimmy Carter. She served as the First Lady of the United States from 1977 to 1981.

She has been a leading voice for many causes. Primarily for mental health research. She sat in on Cabinet and policy meetings, her husband’s closest adviser. She also served as an envoy in Latin America.During her husband’s administration, Rosalynn supported her husband’s public policies.  The idea for her to be in attendance came from her husband’s suggestion after she started to question him about a news story.

“For every person who needs mental health care to be able to receive it close to his home, and to remove the stigma from mental health care so people will be free to talk about it and seek help. It’s been taboo for so long to admit you had a mental health problem.”

Rosalynn Carter sat as an active honorary chair of the President’s Commission on Mental Health. She testified before a Senate committee, the second First Lady to appear before the Congress (the first being Eleanor Roosevelt). The purpose? To speak on behalf of the Mental Health System Bill, enacted in 1980, of her priorities, mental health was the highest. Working to change the nature of government assistance to the mentally ill, Carter wanted to allow people to be comfortable admitting their disabilities without fear of being called crazy.

How to Be Viewed as a Leader

How do emerging leaders become viewed as such by their peers and superiors? What does it take to be considered an emerging leader? What are these people doing that sets them apart, not just in the eyes of their superiors, but also their peers?

It isn’t about being a yes-person or company person or a thankless workhorse. It is about influence. It’s about doing things that make people feel good about the work when you are on the team. They should choose to follow you, your advice and suggestions when offered. Better yet, become the kind of person from whom people seek suggestions and advice.

Influential employees identify problems, take them to people in power, offer practical, thoughtful solutions, note their own role in whatever mess needs mending, and offer to take part in the repair work they suggest. Telling your bosses that all’s not well can be risky when done wrong, but rewarding when you prove yourself to be the “loyal opposition.”

If you’re seen as operating from a small silo while ignoring the organization’s big picture, you won’t be taken seriously. At the same time, if you’re not interested in learning new skills as your business evolves or keeping updated on industry developments, your colleagues won’t count on you to do more than stagnate in the status quo while others lead change.

Finally, people who automatically look for ways to help others tend to do well at work, unless they are so self-sacrificing that they’re taken advantage of and fail to effectively manage their own time and workload.

These principles can be applied to our work inside all kinds of organizations like NPOs and community projects, not just at work.

Source:
https://www.poynter.org/news/four-ways-be-seen-leader-even-when-youre-not-charge