How to Maintain Your Vision for Your Organization

Good leaders are typically comfortable with who they are. This means they are able to do what needs doing and say what needs saying with confidence, even if that means sometimes breaking outside the current paradigm.

This conviction is what gives leaders the ability to create confidence in others. They are enabled to clearly communicate their vision to others around them and motivate them to their own successes which in turn leads to success for the organization.

A good leader is focused on what is best for the organization, unconditionally. They don’t need to prove themselves in the way a new member of the organization might feel the need to. The leader’s vision for the company always comes before their own self-interest.

While good leaders are confident decision makers and allows their inner voice to guide them, they should always be available for consultation and suggestions. Seeing things from as many perspective as possible while maintaining their vision is the best way to achieve it.

 

What is a Leader?

What does leadership mean exactly? The word can conjure many images in the mind.

A political leader. Someone chasing a cause they are passionate about or that is personal to them.

Someone exploring the unknown and the very new. Someone cutting a path through the metaphorical jungle to bring the rest of us along with them.

An executive, CEO or business owner developing their company, their strategies, products and services to beat out the competition.

Leaders are almost always helping themselves, but they cannot be a leader if they are not also helping others do the right things. They set the direction and tone. They build inspirational visions for people to get behind. They create something never before seen.

Leaders also need to be the compass and use their skills in guidance to help others reach the correct destination in a ethical and fair way.

 

Motivation and Energy

A compelling vision provides the foundation for leadership. But it’s leaders’ ability to motivate and inspire people that helps them deliver that vision.

While leaders with a compelling vision provide the keystone for leadership, it is a leader’s ability to motivate people and inspire people that assist them in delivering that vision.

As an example: when you begin a new project, likely you will have lots of energy for it. This makes it easy to win support at first. It can be difficult to find ways to maintain your vision and that energy after that new project magic fades. Good leaders know this and they work hard continuously through the life of the project to help people with their needs and goals to keep the energy up.

To do this, leaders link two expectations. That hard work leads to good results and that good results lead to attractive rewards or incentives.

This motivates people to continue to work hard to achieve the goals and dreams they have for themselves.

 

How to Stand Out As a Future Leader

What does it take to be considered an emerging leader? What are these people doing that sets them apart, not just in the eyes of their current leaders, but also their peers?

How do emerging leaders become viewed as such by their colleagues and superiors?

It isn’t about being a yes-person or company person or a thankless workhorse. It is about influence. It’s about doing things that make people feel good about the work when you are on the team.

They should choose to follow you, your advice and suggestions when offered. Better yet, become the kind of person from whom people seek suggestions and advice.
Influential employees identify problems, take them to people in power, offer practical, thoughtful solutions, note their own role in whatever mess needs mending, and offer to take part in the repair work they suggest.

Being proactive, with a plan and outlining your own roll in it with honesty. This demonstrates that you see your own success as tied directly to the success of the entire organization, that one isn’t just “making moves” for their own benefit.

The Brave New World of Working from Home and Zoom Meetings

 

Zoom-style meetings and remote work are unlikely to go away the near-future and by many accounts are not going anywhere period. Whether in business or in school or another reason, if you’ve participated in a handful of Zoom-style meetings you know that while we see and hear each other there is still a sense of depersonalization when it comes to communicating this way.

In academia where previously the use of emojis, slang and a conversational tone in written communication were frowned upon many are now calling for the use of the colloquial emotional indicators to help heighten the sense that there is a real person “on the other end of the line.”

We will now have to learn about camera angels and how to interact with our audience in a different way. Public speaking and speaking to a camera are two different things. Those who are used to speaking to crowds have trained themselves to continual cast their gaze over the entire audience, making eye contact with as many people as possible. Now we must train ourselves to look at the camera in a casual and pleasing way as this is how we make eye contact during a streaming meeting.

Adding a personal touch when interacting with people inside or outside of our organizations can send a signal loud enough to be heard over all the digital disruption about who we are, what we do, why we do it and what we care about. The naysayers of digital technology worry that we will lose our humanity—this is a way to keep that as a part of your business model.

Guiding Your Team Through This Extra Unusual Holiday Season

It is more important than ever that leaders don’t succumb to compassion fatigue with their organization this holiday season. Very little will be normal for your team members so being extra flexible will be the key to happy and productive holiday season in your organization.

Watch your team members. If an individual losing focus or a normally reliable person is dropping the ball this should be cause for concern. Watch out for absenteeism and people missing scheduled meetings and deadlines. If your team is becoming abrupt with each other or you find yourself mediating more conflicts your team could be getting burnt out.  Be careful that project groups don’t become silos and that there is trust and understanding between different groups.

Assure your team that you are there to share their joy and ease their burdens despite the unusual circumstances. Your employees should know that it is important for them to assume everyone has the team’s best intentions in mind. They are all there to take care of each other. Remind them of how they have succeeded and overcome adversity in the past. Be really specific and tell actual success stories.

It is important to remind them that while you will always appreciate strength and willpower you aren’t expecting a single person to be a superhero. If someone needs to step back and care for themselves, they should.

Ask them to look beyond the present and make clear your vision for the future.

Also, take care of yourself! You are not a super hero either.